CRP USA at AIAA/USU Conference on Small Satellites

CRP USA at AIAA/USU Conference on Small Satellites
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For the third year in a row CRP USA will be attending the Small Satellite Conference and Exhibit at Utah State University from August 5th to August 10th.

The AIAA/USU Conference on Small Satellites is internationally recognized as the premier conference on small satellites.

The event will be held at the Taggart Student Center, and CRP USA will be exhibiting at booth 43T. They will be displaying cutting edge solutions for the space industry manufactured in the WINDFORM family of materials.

Windform LX 2.0, Windform XT 2.0, Windform GT and Windform SP have passed outgassing tests that have been carried out at NASA. The result states: Materials were tested in accordance to the ASTM E-595-07 standard and are considered passing.

CRP USA works alongside key space industry leaders and their staff is ready to welcome SmallSat attendees.

Based in Mooresville, North Carolina, CRP USA employs a highly skilled staff that specializes in the manufacturing and creation of end-use parts and prototypes built from WINDFORM.

CRP USA will show how the use of WINDFORM composite materials, originally developed for the motorsports industry, is now finding many uses in space exploration. CRP USA will also demonstrate the effectiveness of additive manufacturing and use of WINDFORM as a structural material for space applications: with Windform XT 2.0 it is possible to produce a CubeSat designed both as a CubeSat and as a dispensing system.

For over 30 years, the Small Satellite Conference has been a place where innovators, engineers, problem solvers, scientists, entrepreneurs, and dreamers alike come together to tackle challenges and push the boundaries of space exploration.

2017 SmallSat edition will be focused on Big Data: Small satellites are enabling an immense diversity of measurements and observations with clear prospects for developing a new, expanded, and timelier understanding of our world. Technological advances and market-driven applications are motivating broad government and commercial investment in small satellites. Before knowledge products can be extracted, the challenges of collecting, transmitting, managing, manipulating, and interpreting data streams must be overcome. The ability of small satellites to enable big data applications is fundamentally based on systems engineering that draws from the rich technology developed within the small satellite community.

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